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Soviet Air Force 1941/1942 – Defeat & Recovery


The Soviet Air Force in World War II got a very rude awakening. It endured one of the most devastating defeats in aviation history. At the time of the German attack, the force consisted of about 10 to 15 thousand aircraft, of which 7 500 were deployed on the Soviet western theatre, whereas the German Air Force had around 2 800 aircraft deployed for Operation Barbarossa. The Germans achieved a total surprise, and launched an attack with about a thousand bombers against 66 air-fields in the Russian border district. The reported losses in these initial attacks vary, but the Soviet official history states a loss of 800 aircraft stored on the ground, and a total loss of 1 200 aircraft. This basically crippled the Soviet Air Force (units) stationed near the front lines. These attacks also inflicted significant damage and chaos on the logistical side, Thus, by day 3 of Operation Barbarossa, the Luftwaffe was free to focus mainly on supporting the ground troops. In mid-July 1941, the Soviets admitted to the destruction of almost 4 000 aircraft, whereas the German Air Force claimed around 6 900 planes (were) destroyed. The kill claims were probably a bit higher than the real ones, but the official war-time number (was) probably lower. Yet, most importantly, both numbers are substantial. These losses were during the initial phase of Operation Barbarossa, and are based on war-time claims from both sides. According to post-war Soviet and German records, between the beginning of Operation Barbarossa, and the end of (the) year 1941, the losses were approximately as follows: A total of 21 200 aircraft were lost on the Soviet side, with 17 900 combat aircraft, and the loss of 3 300 support aircraft, yet only around 50% of these losses were combat losses. The German side lost a total of 2 500 combat aircraft, and 1 109 damaged. Note that these numbers are quite off, and shouldn’t be compared one-to-one, because both sides counted losses differently. The problem is, I haven’t found a proper article on this topic yet, although a knowledgeable user indicated that German losses were usually total losses, whereas Russian seemed to include damaged vehicles, too. The reason(s) for the disaster are many: some of them were the result of on-going processes, some were structural shortcomings, and others were definite failures in leadership. In any way, Stalin played a major role in most of these factors. Although the Soviet Air Force was successful in the Far East in 1938-39, during the Spanish Civil War, the German Bf 109 outclassed Russian planes like the I-16. The performance of the Red Air Force in the Winter War against Finland was a disaster; thus, a major re-organisation was started in February 1941, which would, at least, take until mid-1942. Thus, it wasn’t finished when the Germans attacked, and made the (Soviet Air) Force even more vulnerable. Additionally, the Soviet expansion into Eastern Poland and the Baltic States required many resources, that would’ve been needed elsewhere. About two-thirds of built or renovated air-fields were located in this region. Thus, many units were still located in unsuited air-fields which were too small or unfinished, which made camouflage and dispersion more difficult. Unlike the British, the Soviets lacked an early-warning system, which resulted in a total surprise combined with Stain’s reluctance to prepare properly for the up-coming German attack. Another major structural problem was created by Stalin’s purges: In 1937, the (Soviet) Air Force had 13 000 officers. Of those, 4 700 were arrested, followed by another 5 600 in 1940. Although some of the arrested officers were later released, it (was) only around 15%. This, of course, had a severe impact on morale and effectiveness, because the (Soviet) Air Force consisted of a large degree of purge survivors, promoted inexperienced young officers, and recruits. The purges also affected the design bureaus for weapons and aircraft: some were dismissed, some (members) were arrested, which often led to execution. (Others) were put in special prison bureaus, like Andrej (Nikolaevič) Tupōlev. Furthermore, the drastic measures and understandable fears surrounding the purges also inflicted the production of aircraft, because changing the production line from one aircraft to another can be quite complicated, and usually include(d) a severe reduction in efficiency, for adapting machinery and processes. This loss, or better investment of time could easily (be) seen as “sabotage”, so most factories were reluctant to switching over to new models. As a result, in 1940, 7 300 older models were produced, whereas only around 200 of newer models were produced. The numbers, especially for newer models, increased in 1941, yet training on the new aircraft was kept to a minimum, due to (the) fear of losses caused by accidents, which would also lead to “sabotage” or other charges. I guess Stalin would’ve been a huge Beastie Boys, or maybe the other way around. (That would at least explain those moustaches.) Oh well, I digress. Let’s take a look at the recovery of the Soviet Air Force. Although German losses were way lower than Soviet ones, the Luftwaffe also had fewer aircraft available in the beginning. Furthermore, the logistical system of the Luftwaffe was unsuited for a long war in Russia – something I(‘ve) discussed in a previous video. Already, in October and November, the Russians ordered attacks against Luftwaffe air-fields. Additionally, since the Japanese were no longer a threat, more than 1 000 aircraft from the Far East arrived. All this helped to slowly tip the balance. Whereas in (the) end of September 1941 could oppose 1 000 Luftwaffe aeroplanes with only 550 of their own, in mid-November, the situation was quite different, with 670 Luftwaffe planes versus 1 140 Russian planes. Yet the numbers alone didn’t win the battle for the Red Air Force, but the balance was slowly changing, and in Fall 1942, the Luftwaffe got seriously challenged. After Hitler denied the 6th Army to break out of Stalingrad, it was supplied only by the Luftwaffe. The Soviets (then) established the so-called “aerial blockade”, and after 2 months of intensive fighting, the Luftwaffe’s air superiority was finally lost. Let’s take a look at the major factors that contributed to the resurrection of the Soviet Air Force: One aspect was the mostly-successful evacuation of the aircraft industry and the lack of German attacks against it. Furthermore, the successful creation of a talented command staff and a successful re-organisation The re-structuring efforts included the transformation (of units) into Air Divisions, where each Division consisted of one type of aircraft, which improved the logistics and command efficiency. Additionally, the use of on-board radios grew, which allowed better co-ordination with ground stations for warning and command-and-control. There were also tactical changes, like the creation of special “Ace” units, and the use of (the) free hands of experienced pilots. The Soviet air doctrine focussed strongly on fighters in order to achieve air superiority. Thus, a considerable effort was spent to develop the Fighter Arm into an elite force. All these changes and the continuous Luftwaffe losses allowed the Soviet Air Force to break the air superiority of the Luftwaffe, and, subsequently, force it into a defensive role. Thus, within 18 months, the Soviet Air Force was able to recover and deal a severe blow against its enemy. Thank you for watching, please like, comment, and share, and subscribe… …and… …see you next time! [“Demilitarised Zone” by Ethan Meixsell]
Subtitles by: Eitchviel

Tony wyaad

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95 COMMENTS

  1. Faisel Saeed Posted on April 22, 2016 at 10:27 am

    Amazing video as always 😀

    Reply
  2. Cannonfodder43 Posted on April 22, 2016 at 11:10 am

    Another excellent video as always. 🙂

    Reply
  3. Orion YT Posted on April 22, 2016 at 11:14 am

    Nice video. Russian losses are eye opening. 😮

    Reply
  4. SterlingSteve Posted on April 22, 2016 at 11:26 am

    Nice work. I hope to see you do something on the French airforce at some point.

    Reply
  5. Florian Wittig Posted on April 22, 2016 at 11:55 am

    Would have loved to see a graphic with the numbers of January 1945 and the Weichsel-Front. I read it was something like barely 100 planes for the Luftwaffe with not enough fuel vs. 18.000 planes of the Red Army.

    Anyway, I have this photo of my great-grandfather of a few I-16s on the ground shortly after Operation Barbarossa started: http://imgur.com/XYlNuYw
    Might this picture be related to the evacuation of the industry? The picture is very likely taken in the area of Lviv.

    Reply
  6. recon681 Posted on April 22, 2016 at 12:11 pm

    Great video,MHV.Keep it up! 😀

    Reply
  7. MaxRavenclaw Posted on April 22, 2016 at 12:32 pm

    Tank wise, it is 100% certain that the Germans only counted total losses. So a Pz.IV that was taken out in the east, then recovered and repaired, taken out again in the west, then recovered and converted into a StuG IV, then finally blown up by a bomber would only count as one loss for the Germans. For the Allies, that would count as 3 losses.

    Not sure about planes, though.

    Reply
  8. Evan Pinter Posted on April 22, 2016 at 12:57 pm

    Another great vid!

    Reply
  9. Farhan Makarim Posted on April 22, 2016 at 3:05 pm

    can you make video about ijn (imperial Japanese navy ) or us navy structure

    great video btw i love all your video

    Reply
  10. Firefly Posted on April 22, 2016 at 3:06 pm

    The claim that the Soviets counted damaged aircraft as losses too seems plausible – this system was in place in their registers of destroyed army equipment. For example, a tank that was left behind on the battlefield because it ran out of fuel or threw a track and became immobile was counted as a total loss in Soviet registers, and even if it was towed from the battlefield and repaired the very next day it was still included in these numbers.

    Additionally, the Soviets had by the end of the war developed a system of repair depots and field workshops where a number of these 'destroyed' vehicles were brought back to operational status in a very short time. This is also why the Soviet vehicle losses on the Eastern Front seem so incredibly high compared to German losses. Usually this is because of authors unknowingly taking numbers from Soviet and German statistics without delving into the methodology involved.

    On the other hand, while some Soviet kill statistics seem elevated, be it with tanks or aircraft (just like all the other forces of WW2, where pilots and gunners sometimes tended to claim kills that others claimed too), but most reports that I've seen are actually quite accurate, though modern assessment of some of these kill claims can be difficult because of obvious factors like the passage of time, battlefield confusion and political interference (which is almost sure to have played some part in some Hero of the Soviet Union order citations).

    Reply
  11. Jeff Grimes Posted on April 22, 2016 at 5:12 pm

    Great video! The Stalin head should definitely be re-used in the future to show "failures of leadership".

    Reply
  12. Kolaris8472 Posted on April 22, 2016 at 7:27 pm

    What was the cause of the significant non-combat losses? Logistical deficiencies?

    Reply
  13. Kleingirl Posted on April 22, 2016 at 7:57 pm

    Oh my god you're a video machine!

    I love your videos <3

    Reply
  14. Alfredo Jonstone Posted on April 24, 2016 at 5:50 pm

    Stalin as a Beastie Boy fan . Great Image – cap on backwards (check) Flava Flav clock (check) and commissars uniform (check).

    Reply
  15. Ruebacca Posted on April 24, 2016 at 8:37 pm

    The commander of the Russian bomber force shot himself on the afternoon of the first day of Barbarossa.  USA provided high quality 100+ Octane aviation fuel to England and Russia.  My 2 cents.

    Reply
  16. Rob With One B Posted on April 24, 2016 at 10:50 pm

    Fascinating! Are you going to do anything on interwar tank doctrine development?

    Reply
  17. James Hardy Posted on April 24, 2016 at 11:37 pm

    I'm really glad I came across this channel. I hope it gets the support that it deserves

    Reply
  18. PlayinArse Posted on May 13, 2016 at 8:41 am

    Loved the video, however I'm surprised you didn't include anything about the foreign supplies of fighter aircraft which numbered around 12-14,000 during the early years of Operation Barbarossa. Without these imports it would have been impossible for the Soviets to get back on their feet and turn the tide of the war.

    Reply
  19. willconq Posted on May 23, 2016 at 3:15 am

    I thoroughly enjoyed the video. A couple of points. You might have mentioned Anglo-American Lend-lease aircraft particularly during the critical battles for Leningrad and Moscow. Also, the massive efforts by the Anglo-American Air Forces in North Africa, Italy, the Balkans, Western Europe, and over Germany.

    Reply
  20. imperviousness Posted on May 29, 2016 at 6:39 am

    wow great video it's a relief to watch something that doesn't equate the German loss to German stupidity and russian luck in spite of their foolishness and lack of intelligence

    Reply
  21. JAFESAHO Posted on May 31, 2016 at 11:07 am

    there is also another thing to take into account. I know countries air forces had different ways on reporting numbers of enemy planes shot down. In Germany only the one pilot had to report an enemy kill and in the UK two pilots had to see a enemy kill for it to count. I am not sure about the soviet system but this could make a difference.

    Reply
  22. Pyotyr Young Posted on June 2, 2016 at 4:34 pm

    I like the way all the negatives are attributed to Stalin and none of the positives.

    Reply
  23. 0utc4st1985 Posted on June 11, 2016 at 12:11 am

    I would suppose other factors of the Soviet's victory in the air would include the Luftwaffe's losses in the debacle that was the Battle of Britain and Allied bombing raids in Germany.

    Reply
  24. wartornworld Posted on June 11, 2016 at 2:16 pm

    Excellent video.

    Reply
  25. sharkfinbite Posted on June 12, 2016 at 1:37 pm

    Stalin really was a bad leader for Russia. You'll hear a lot of pro-Communist sympathizers and over nostalgic communist believers say he was a great man. He wasn't. HE WASN'T!!!! When you have people who are communists say Stalin's USSR isn't true communism than this should indicate to you he was awful since some of the believers of communism try to disconnect and separate themselves as much as they can from it while still trying to glorify communism.

    Reply
  26. VisciousPhishes Posted on June 15, 2016 at 5:31 am

    I'm tellin' all a yall it's a SABOTAGE!

    Reply
  27. continentalmilitaria Posted on June 15, 2016 at 5:33 pm

    The Luftwaffe did not have a proper 4 engine bomber. Hitler believed it was better to have two bombers with 2 engines each that one bomber with 4 engines. Thus the Luftwaffe bombers did not have the required range to bomb Soviet factories that were behind the Ural mountains. This resulted in the soviet factories being safe from bombing and were thus able to produce aircraft and other war material unhindered.

    Reply
  28. Diamonddogusa Posted on June 19, 2016 at 3:53 pm

    Another important factor in the relatively quick resurgence of the Red Air Force was pilot availability after the initial attack. Since so many planes were destroyed on the ground, the pilots survived the destruction of their plane. This meant that instead of being shot down and killed in an I-15 or I-16, they would be available to fly the new LaGG 1or 3, Yak 1, MiG 1 or 3, or something lend lease. While those planes were still not as good as the German ones, they were a sight better than what they would have flown. Further, fighting over their own territory allowed the increased likelihood of a surviving pilot being recovered. (this was particularly important during the Battle of Britain.) By the the time La-5s and Yak 7s appeared, the Germans were doomed.

    Reply
  29. Davor Babić Posted on June 19, 2016 at 9:21 pm

    A big reason for the dip in production, that A. Jakolev brings up in his memoirs, is that most of the Soviet aircraft factories were located in the west, and that almost all production had to be halted for a while, while these factories (together with the factories that supplied them with parts and materials) and their crews were relocated to Siberia.

    Reply
  30. secretace Posted on June 22, 2016 at 2:23 am

    Just subscribed~ Number 22,000!

    Reply
  31. New Toy reviews by Scarlett Posted on June 24, 2016 at 3:04 am

    My dad loves your videos!

    Reply
  32. Advaiet Mishra Posted on June 25, 2016 at 3:53 am

    good video

    Reply
  33. Stuart M. Posted on June 25, 2016 at 12:14 pm

    Was there any mention of the generous lend-lease programs that sent many fighter planes from America to Russia in this video? I think the assistance the Russians got from America and other allies was quite significant and shouldn't just be ignored.

    Reply
  34. hi Posted on June 26, 2016 at 7:01 am

    Dope videos man! 💯

    Reply
  35. maxmagnus777 Posted on June 26, 2016 at 4:45 pm

    Great wideo. I would love to see a video on change and development of Russian tactics after the war started. Also the strategy that were developed by the Russian specialised units such as snipers in Stalingrad.

    Reply
  36. apsarator Posted on June 27, 2016 at 5:01 am

    You are the Lord of Icons – loved the "Stalin Purge" icon.

    Reply
  37. James Jacocks Posted on June 28, 2016 at 8:35 pm

    Stalin (a universally despised monster) had so much to do with the fiasco and recovery. The thing that seems incongruent is that the industrial capacity of the USSR was not great, especially as to sophisticated products, and yet the Ural factories made so many good aircraft and tanks. The gun-to-the-head effect?

    Reply
  38. leakycheese Posted on June 28, 2016 at 10:08 pm

    Loved the Beastie Boys reference! Great video thanks.

    Reply
  39. Crazylalalalala Posted on July 13, 2016 at 8:35 pm

    That god damn Shtalin..

    Reply
  40. Daniel Mellbin Posted on July 15, 2016 at 5:32 pm

    "Schtalin" 😀 Makes me giggle. Joking aside – gj – keep it up 🙂

    Reply
  41. OCDemonetized Posted on July 16, 2016 at 11:26 am

    Its not Shtalin, but Stalin.

    Reply
  42. Bullseye clone Posted on July 22, 2016 at 3:31 am

    Could you discuss the air battles on the eastern front leading up to and during Operation Citadel?

    Reply
  43. nick vaskas Posted on July 24, 2016 at 3:41 am

    This my first visit to your channel. I'm impressed! I love history particularly World War II onwards. This is part of the reason I am proud to be from Russia.

    Reply
  44. 101jir Posted on August 20, 2016 at 6:30 pm

    4:09 Though to be fair, the Germans also imprisoned geniuses like Doctor Junkers. I suppose the difference is that the Soviets just did it on a grander scale? In any case, when fighting each other I would think that the Germans behaving similarly may have reduced the impact that the purge would have had if Germany hadn't had purges of their own

    Reply
  45. Alphonse Zukor Posted on August 24, 2016 at 2:28 am

    Bismarck sent me here, I hope you two collaborate more in the future.

    Reply
  46. JohnMarrington Posted on August 31, 2016 at 10:54 am

    Also ich muss dir hier echt Mal ein fettes Lob aussprechen. Interessiere mich selber sehr für WW2 und gebe mich auch mit einem Komplexitätsgrad der Erläuterung unterhalb von "Das deutsche Reich und der zweite Weltkrieg" nicht zufrieden. Habe bei deiner Darstellung noch keinen Fehler gefunden. Weiter so

    Reply
  47. Geoff Dearth Posted on September 11, 2016 at 5:37 pm

    One could argue that the Germans did the Russians a favor by "clearing away" large numbers of obsolete planes thus forcing them to come up with better ones. A similar thing was true with armored vehicles.

    Reply
  48. Skip Posted on September 22, 2016 at 11:56 pm

    Thing is, the Soviet Air Force's recovery was partly due to the Western Allies, as they invaded North Africa, Sicily, and conducted bombing raids over Germany, Germany had to move more and more planes to the West, they moved 400 planes to the Mediterranean in late '42 for example.

    Reply
  49. ZAFODBIBLBROKS1 Posted on September 23, 2016 at 11:15 am

    There is history, and there is propaganda.
    This video is not "history". This video is a good example of propaganda of the cold war. Like all propaganda, this video is for people who can't think logically. Let's start in order.
    1. In this video, it is alleged that the Russian air force gained supremacy in the air only 18 months after the beginning of operation "Barbarossa".
    Attention a question: Who owned air supremacy on the Eastern front in November-December 1941, when the Russians defeated the German troops at Tikhvin (near Leningrad(St. Petersburg), Rostov-on-don and Moscow?
    There is the law of war: on the ground the winner is the one who has the supremacy in the air. The Eastern front is no exception. In November-December 1941, the Russian has won three major land battles (Tikhvin, Moscow, Rostov-on-don). Could Russian to win a land victory without air superiority? No! Could the Germans be defeated in land battles with air supremacy? No!
    It turns out that in November-December 1941 on the Eastern front air superiority belonged to the Russian? Yes, exactly. Statistics sorties says clearly: on the Eastern front from November 1941 to April 1942 air supremacy belonged to the Russian air force. In may 1942 the Luftwaffe had regained air supremacy on the Eastern front.
    November 1941 is not "18 months after the start of "Barbarossa", is only 5 (five) month after the beginning of "Barbarossa". I mean the author of the video lied. As we Russians say: congratulations, citizen, you done lied.

    Reply
  50. ZAFODBIBLBROKS1 Posted on September 23, 2016 at 11:51 am

    There is history, and there is propaganda.
    This video is not "history". This video is a good example of propaganda of the cold war. Like all propaganda, this video is for people who can't think logically. Let's start in order.
    2. On the first day of "Barbarossa" the Russian air force had 4,000 (four thousand) of the old fighters I-16. After 1940, the fighter I-16 was not made. If the loss of the Russian air force really was so large, 4000-16 was supposed to disappear in the first few weeks of the war. However, the old I-16 was the main Russian fighters not only in 1941, but in 1942. So something is wrong with the casualty figures of Russian aviation, which we call "historians". As said Russian propaganda: May the Germans defeated all the Russian fighting on the Eastern front with windmills?

    Reply
  51. Johann Emilio Posted on October 8, 2016 at 9:40 am

    Deine Videos sind unterhaltsam und informativ. Weiter so!

    Reply
  52. Daniel Eyre Posted on October 24, 2016 at 7:28 am

    You forgot to mention the mass importation of Bell P-39 Airacobra's to fill the gap until he Lavochkin and Yakovlev production lines got back into full swing.

    Reply
  53. leftcoaster67 Posted on October 30, 2016 at 8:35 pm

    It was all because of Russian Bias in War Thunder that helped. LOL.

    Reply
  54. binaway Posted on November 3, 2016 at 9:17 pm

    Also the Luftwaffe had to keep a lot of it's aircraft in the West and the Mediterranean whereas the Soviets could devote all it's strength to the Eastern front with additional supplies from the US and UK.

    Reply
  55. Ivor Biggun Posted on November 4, 2016 at 7:08 pm

    I'd love to hear you say…" For you Tommy, zee vaw ist ofer "

    Reply
  56. akgeronimo501 Posted on December 4, 2016 at 5:49 pm

    I would love to see the effect of Lend Lease in the recovery of the Soviet Air Force. We know they received at least 10,000 aircraft from the US during the entire war.

    Reply
  57. Tootrill 843 Posted on December 5, 2016 at 11:15 pm

    there was no defeat for russia it had russian bias on its side

    Reply
  58. Greg Borodin Posted on December 7, 2016 at 6:51 am

    Mistakes:
    1. Germans did not achieve any surprise. This is myth. Official soviet propaganda about 800 lost aircrafts on the fields is bullshit and could not cripple 7000 air force. (The number 7000 that you mention is also wrong, where did you take it from?)
    2. The old models(I-153) were mass produced due to the army order (they considered good enough to support bombers) and not due to the factory reluctance. Stalin did not ask factories what they want or did not want to produce.
    3. Russian airforce(bombers and fighters) did not recover. It started the war poorly. It fought poorly. And it finished the war poorly. If you disagree, then how do you measure their success? May be you think that German stukas did not bomb whatever they want and whenever they wanted on the eastern front? On the other hand sturmoviks(il-2) did their job relatively well. But At the beginning of the war it was not too many of them. So it was not a recovery.
    4. The real reason for soviet airforce not to collapse.
    a. Germans did not take it seriously. They needed to protect their own sky from allied bombers. So less than 25% of the fighters were on the eastern front on average.
    b. Lend lease!!!!!
    c. Lend lease!!!!!

    Reply
  59. Alexander Seven Posted on January 2, 2017 at 1:38 pm

    You really know literally nothing about Stalin and Soviet Union and how it was organized inside.

    Reply
  60. alganhar1 Posted on January 5, 2017 at 9:52 pm

    Another factor you overlooked, though was still important, is that unlike the Wermacht, the Luftwaffe's main strength after Barbarossa was kept in the West as first Britains, then the combined US and British Bombing campaigns got underway.

    Despite some perceptions that the RAF was at the verge of collapse by the end of the BoB it was not. True, it was tired, but by the end of the BoB the UK actually had more fighters and Pilots than they started the battle with. As a result following the end of the BoB the RAF fighter squadrons initiated the so called Rhubarb Raids during which the fighters would penetrate into German occupied territory and attempt to shoot up anything they saw. Add that to the steadily increasing numbers of bombers hitting targets in the German heartland and it led to a steadily increasing percentage of the Luftwaffe's fighter squadrons being pulled awaay from other theatres to bolster up the defences of the Fatherland.

    Reply
  61. MR.Chickennuget 360 Posted on January 6, 2017 at 9:55 am

    it would be awsome if you would do a episode on the entire "grand strategy" of the Air War in Europe, including USSR, US and UK air strategy and German tactics to counter these.

    Reply
  62. Paciat Posted on February 26, 2017 at 1:22 pm

    Nothing said about Soviet planes stationed 800m (in enemy infantry rifle range) from the border on Brest airfield. Noone does that when planning defense. Why did Stalin moved his troops west from the "Stalin line" fortifications, without any depth in mind, building amphibious tanks – useless in defense, fast tanks that can drop tracks and drive on European roads even faster, paratrooper units, bunker buster tanks? Why do Soviet propaganda posters showing the Red army in offensive posture?
    Barbarossa was a preemptive strike, and it was successful just like the jews were in the "6 day war".

    Reply
  63. Nolan Bravo Posted on February 28, 2017 at 6:28 am

    Who is Shtalin?

    Reply
  64. Kayraaa2 Posted on March 1, 2017 at 6:56 pm

    How about American aircraft sent via lend lease? The Russians loved the P-63 Kingcobra.

    Reply
  65. Cliff Li Posted on March 9, 2017 at 9:58 pm

    what was the other channel where its focus more on air combat again, thanks!

    Reply
  66. Otto Pike Posted on March 10, 2017 at 5:12 pm

    Stalin's mustache explained.

    Reply
  67. TIK Posted on March 22, 2017 at 10:10 am

    How much do depleted fuel stocks also factor into this? German ground forces were constantly out of fuel during Barbarossa, and especially afterwards. I imagine it was the same with the Luftwaffe.

    Reply
  68. TREY RIVER Posted on May 11, 2017 at 3:09 am

    the arival of western fighter in early 42 also helped
    http://lend-lease.airforce.ru/english/articles/index.htm
    http://lend-lease.airforce.ru/english/articles/romanenko/p-39/

    Reply
  69. World View Posted on May 19, 2017 at 8:02 pm

    Artillery was more important than air power in eastern front. It was even more important than armor.

    Reply
  70. O T Posted on June 5, 2017 at 3:30 am

    You totally failed to mention the impact of the Lend-Lease…..This provided aircraft before the Russians could get their factories going.

    Reply
  71. Artem Bilous Posted on June 11, 2017 at 10:55 pm

    Please read Mark Solonin, solonin.org he has English version and German version of his website.

    Facts about Spanish war are not true, warning system is not true,

    please stop this disinformation!!!!!

    Reply
  72. Williamz Posted on June 12, 2017 at 12:12 pm

    "Schtalin"

    I'm sorry. Great video as always.

    Reply
  73. World View Posted on July 11, 2017 at 4:40 pm

    In 1944 it was 8 times more dangerous for Luftwaffe pilots to fly against RAF/USAAF than in Eastern Front. The loss rate of Luftwaffe per combat flying mission in Eastern Front was 0.7% while devastating 5.4% in west and south. So with these figures we can claim that USAAF/RAF were 8 times more effective than Soviet VVS. Luftwaffe had same loss rate (0.7% per combat mission) in Eastern Front also in 1943.

    Reply
  74. Charles McCarron Posted on July 19, 2017 at 4:32 am

    The numbers alone of Soviet aircraft, tanks and paratroopers deployed in the western Soviet military districts PROVE beyond a shadow of a doubt that Stalin was preparing to invade Europe. Barbarossa was in fact a preemptive attack.

    Reply
  75. Cjephunneh Posted on July 26, 2017 at 7:24 pm

    " as a reesult the chapanese fought the Americans…."
    Do us all a favor…. and get an English narrator to read your videos….. I have to listen to every videos twice becuase your accent is bad.

    Reply
  76. Cam Laffy Taffy Posted on August 18, 2017 at 9:52 pm

    plz do a video/research on the changes in soviet ground force tactics after stalingrad: 1.) numerical superiority in all 'weapons of war', 2.) intelligence secrecy, 3.) upgraded equipment, 4.) both summer and winter offensives now available after Kursk

    Reply
  77. Ingrian Posted on August 26, 2017 at 3:03 pm

    Soviet VVS never really recovered. There is an interesting compare of Luftwaffe loss rate per combat mission even in 1944: 0.703% in Eastern Front while horrific 5.4% in west. So it was 8 times more dangerous for Luftwaffe pilot in 1944 to fly against RAF/USAAF than against pathetic low level Soviet VVS.

    Reply
  78. World View Posted on August 26, 2017 at 3:08 pm

    It's true that claims of WW2 fighter pilots are mostly exaggerations. A study made in Finland where Finnish Air Force, Luftwaffe, VVS and Soviet Navy air force were operating is interesting. Finns had over claims rate of 1:2.2, German in 1944 1:5 and Soviet pilots 1:16. Only 1 of 16 of VVS pilot claims were true. The kill rate of Finnish Bf-109 squadrons in 1944 are suggesting 18 times more claims than own losses which meant that Finns in reality won combat with 1:8. Quite possible. Finns had huge majority of their well trained pilots operating while Germans had lost them. VVS was still crap in 1944.

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  79. kevinthe hamster Posted on October 17, 2017 at 10:39 pm

    I’m always amazed as I read comments,critical or not, about Lend Lease that seldom is America’s support discussed with reference to the Pacific War. The US built a fleet, air arm and ground forces of sufficient capacity to simultaneously defeat Japan while being decisive in Europe. They may not have been able to beat Germany on their own, almost certainly not by 1945. But without them the USSR and UK would almost certainly have sued for peace. The US was the indispensable ally.

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  80. Count Rufus Posted on November 28, 2017 at 4:42 pm

    Hitler and Stalin were 2 of worst things that ever happened in Europe

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  81. MikeJones9000 Posted on December 3, 2017 at 3:30 am

    have you made a video about the impact of lend lease for all allies?

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  82. 98erics Posted on April 9, 2018 at 1:28 pm

    Hell yeah man, I had to pause the video at the Beastie Boy reference. Upvote for both cool and cultural humor!

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  83. Thomas Tufts Posted on April 28, 2018 at 5:16 pm

    I was not prepared for the Beatie Boys reference…very funny!

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  84. World View Posted on May 6, 2018 at 6:32 am

    How reliable are official Soviet loss figures of 106 400 lost aircraft of which just 46 100 in combat? Let's remember they produced almost 160 000 aircraft (from june 41 to may 45) and got over 18 000 from western allied. In June 1941 they had almost as many aircraft as they had in May 1945. In a way or another they must have written off some 175 000 aircraft anyway. That 46 100 is just 26% of those written offs. I understand 40% share but not as low as 26%.

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  85. Rajendra Chavan Posted on May 27, 2018 at 5:53 pm

    I heard that Soviet navy was quite challenging to German navy during ww2. If you have any knowledge please share to us.

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  86. L Myrski Posted on July 23, 2018 at 10:07 pm

    Video completely ignores the draining off of German aircraft to fight on other fronts against more threatening and capable foes (in the air at least), and the video ignores the huge supply of aircraft and other equipment provided by the Western Allies. Even with all these aircraft the Russians, despite grossly inflated IL-2 claims, achieved little with their air fleet other than a semi-blockade of Stalingrad until the last year of the war in comparison to the Western allies. Overall, the Soviet air contribution was a bit of a failure given the numbers and resources involved.

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  87. Patrick Doyle Posted on November 29, 2018 at 1:37 pm

    I love the fact that a video on the early war Soviet Air Force references the Beastie Boys.

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  88. seb clot Posted on December 10, 2018 at 9:08 am

    You neglected to mention the effect of the Western and Mediterranean fronts. From late 1942 on, considerable Luftwaffe resources were moved west to deal with Allied bombing missions against German industrial targets and the deteriorating situation in the Mediterranean. I believe that was bigger problem than the recovery by the Soviet Air Force.

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  89. CloneD Anon Posted on January 7, 2019 at 9:53 am

    All the people who call lend-lease as "help" are WRONG. Lend-lease was SOLD to USSR for pure gold at and higher than average prices for 722 million USD (1940's conversion ratio)! People also forget that U.K received WAY MORE from the U.S than USSR and UK is way smaller counttry. Not to mention that not counting the raw materials the military tech was either old and kinda obsolete already by the standards of WW2 that was sent to the USSR. Beyond the trucks and some fighters (like the Cobras that were kinda popular among Soviet air force pilots due to their high caliber nose gun) there were not much other decent military tech that that U.S provided or that USSR could not produce themselves.

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  90. madhumita dey Posted on March 8, 2019 at 6:05 pm

    Sir my question is how much did the British & American lend lease program helped in the recovery of the VVS? Did it really added up a vital amount of force or did it buy Soviet Union some time to recover & reinforce themselves?

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  91. Maekar I Targaryen Posted on April 3, 2019 at 5:42 am

    I don't think Stalin would have agreed with the sentiment "you have to find for your right to fight to party"

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  92. eyalcr500 Posted on July 20, 2019 at 2:44 pm

    "…Shtalin…" :-)) i love the accent ,man !

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  93. your mum Posted on September 30, 2019 at 1:04 am

    9/10 no communism anthem

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  94. Nick Danger Posted on October 14, 2019 at 12:15 pm

    Air Defence of the Reich 4 September 1939 to 8 May 1945 Over 97,000 aircraft destroyed
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defence_of_the_Reich

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